A course in painting fundamentals emphasizing techniques, approaches, materials, composition, color, surface, etc., as applied to both abstract and realistically drawn forms. This is a structured course, and students will be expected to work both in oil and acrylic media. Problem-solving exercises will be assigned. Slide presentations, museum visits, and critiques as appropriate. Open to all students.
A course in painting fundamentals emphasizing techniques, approaches, materials, composition, color, surface, etc., as applied to both abstract and realistically drawn forms. This is a structured course, and students will be expected to work both in oil and acrylic media. Problem-solving exercises will be assigned. Slide presentations, museum visits, and critiques as appropriate. Open to all students.
An introduction to the valued resource of the human figure as a subject in art. Working from male and female models, nude and costumed, we will try many approaches: objective (clearly seen), subjective (deeply felt) and, of course, all shades in between; quick gestural sketches as well as extended studies; the whole figure, and details of the figure; and the figure and space as compositional elements. We will try a great many drawing materials. A detailed list will be provided in class.
An introduction to the valued resource of the human figure as a subject in art. Working from male and female models, nude and costumed, we will try many approaches: objective (clearly seen), subjective (deeply felt) and, of course, all shades in between; quick gestural sketches as well as extended studies; the whole figure, and details of the figure; and the figure and space as compositional elements. We will try a great many drawing materials. A detailed list will be provided in class.
An introduction to the valued resource of the human figure as a subject in art. Working from male and female models, nude and costumed, we will try many approaches: objective (clearly seen), subjective (deeply felt) and, of course, all shades in between; quick gestural sketches as well as extended studies; the whole figure, and details of the figure; and the figure and space as compositional elements. We will try a great many drawing materials. A detailed list will be provided in class.
This course covers the 'how' and 'why' of preparing supports and surfaces, making and applying paint, and constructing paintings in a technically sound way with hand-made traditional western and eastern painting materials. Lectures, demonstrations, museum visits, reading, and student research will complement the hands-on studio experience of painting. Open to anyone with an interest in painting, this class could be beneficial if you are just beginning to paint or if you are already experienced and would like more precise information and a greater practical understanding.
This class is the sequel to Drawing 1 in Core. It focuses on all the issues of drawing: line, space, composition, value, light and shadow, and the ability to draw what is seen with accuracy. The class will have an emphasis on life drawing and is a requirement for majors in Painting, Drawing and Printmaking. The Structure, Anatomy, and Expressive Design of Human Form This course is designed to cover formal principals, concepts, and techniques employed in drawing the anatomy of the human figure. In addition to a classical understanding of rendering the figure through anatomical studies, students will also work on developing an expressive means of drawing. This will attempt to bridge the gap between the clinically precise anatomy text, the living model, and the demands of creative figure drawing. Students will learn to think from simple to complex and from mass to detail. Identification and cataloguing of names and details of bones, muscles and landmarks will be expected, and in class drawing will be from observation.
This class is the sequel to Drawing 1 in Core. It focuses on all the issues of drawing: line, space, composition, value, light and shadow, and the ability to draw what is seen with accuracy. The class will have an emphasis on life drawing and is a requirement for majors in Painting, Drawing and Printmaking. How does one build a narrative? How do you compose a visual story within the picture plane? This class will create projects that address these questions as well as introducing, through slides, books and visual images, a bevy of artists who use narrative in their own work. Drawing and painting especially lend themselves to telling a story. Those stories may derive from personal experience, political or social critique, fantasy or irony. They might take the form of cartoon imagery, graffiti, collage, or realism.
We will deal with the basic technical and aesthetic problems of painting. The level of presentation will accommodate each individual student, and demonstrations will occur as they are needed. The goal for each student is toward focus and artistic development. A model will be available when necessary. Encounters in Painting and Film What do filmmakers and painters have in common? The history of the dynamic relationship between painting and film/video remains influential to both disciplines today. When looking at and speaking of Michelangelo Antononi, John Baldessari, William Kentridge, Pipilotti Rist, Mary Reid Kelley, Terence Malik, Yayoi Kusama, Andy Warhol, Wilhelm Sasnal, Erica Gibson, David Lynch and the Kuchar brothers, among many others, we can see the flow of ideas back and forth across the boundaries of these disciplines. Puppets, color field, stop animation, painting movie sets and painting movie stars, stills, collage, and the examination of narrative from the single image to multiple frames are all examples of tools for making used in both painting and film. Students will experiment in either/both mediums as they work towards a final project. Kirby and Anno will provide a class that allows for provocative and quality studio time to make new works. Lectures, field trips, lab time will be included.
Digital Tools: Expanded Painting This course will focus on expanding a students painting and drawing practice by incorporating processes that fluctuate between the digital and handmade with an emphasis on the maker's hand. Scan, layer, make marks, edit, and experiment with source material on the computer to create a new source for painting, drawing or object making. Output a sketch to work from or print directly onto canvas, photo or fine arts paper, then paint, layer, collage, build form and make your own marks. Learn how to use and integrate Photoshop both as a tool for making and for preparing digital images of your finished artworks for web and portfolio presentations.
Media History 1: Dead Painters 1945 to 1985 Post/Modern Issues In 1839, according to legend, Parisian painter Paul Delaroche first saw a Daguerreotype. He is said to have exclaimed, From today, painting is dead! Painting has since died-or been declared dead-many times. Is painting a zombie? A phoenix? Surveying European and American painting in the period from 1945 to 1985, this course will consider the following questions: How do we understand this important oscillation in the history of modern and postmodern art? How did painting respond, not only to the challenges of photography, film, and mass-market print culture, but to the rise of global commodity culture, the trauma of world war and genocide, struggles for civil rights, and the emergence of twentieth-century feminism? How has painting coped with art movements such as Minimalism and Conceptualism, by which it was aggressively marginalized? Examining primary and secondary source-texts, this reading-intensive, discussion-based class will ground students in key aspects of modernist and postmodernist thinking, and prepare them for Media History 2: Living Painters, or Contemporary Issues in Painting, 1985-2013.
The focus of l'atelier environment is providing students with a foundation and resource from which to interact and explore. It is a learning place which incorporates the studio and the city as work space, accessing discussions, seminars and interaction with professionals. The student is also considered a resource and will be expected to contribute from their own area of specialty and concentration. The atelier is a space that creates opportunities of discovery to inspire and maximize skills in an urban setting.
Whatever shape your art will have taken by the time it is finished, it will pass through a state of being that it is fair to call drawing. That is: trying it out, probing its depth, turning it inside out, seeing it, the limits of your imagination about subject, concept, material, process. You may make something you've never seen before. For adventuresome students from all majors.
For senior painting students who are independent and committed. You should expect the results of one project to lend momentum, inspiration, and continuity to the next, and so on. You will learn to bring closure to a painting or to a body of work, and come to grips with the idea of exhibiting your work publicly. You will learn to participate in and value constructive criticism. All students are expected to share insights, explorations and questions during class discussion.
For senior painting students who are independent and committed. You should expect the results of one project to lend momentum, inspiration, and continuity to the next, and so on. You will learn to bring closure to a painting or to a body of work, and come to grips with the idea of exhibiting your work publicly. You will learn to participate in and value constructive criticism. All students are expected to share insights, explorations and questions during class discussion.
The exit-level studio course in which critical attention is directed toward the combined work of all of your senior level studios - how all of your work inter-relates and identifies your stance as an artist. A set of slides of work and a self-defined presentation to the class will be required of each student. Some attention will be devoted to professional practices in fine arts, and a series of workshops on practical topics will be scheduled, outside of class time, in support of this aspect of senior projects from all programs.
The exit-level studio course in which critical attention is directed toward the combined work of all of your senior level studios - how all of your work inter-relates and identifies your stance as an artist. A set of slides of work and a self-defined presentation to the class will be required of each student. Some attention will be devoted to professional practices in fine arts, and a series of workshops on practical topics will be scheduled, outside of class time, in support of this aspect of senior projects from all programs.