Introduction to the fundamentals of woodworking and its application to furniture. Topics covered in detail will include: the care and use of hand tools, hand power tools and larger woodworking machinery; fundamental techniques such as carving, shaping and finishing; joinery technology, construction processes and conventions; basic furniture design and wood technology. Processes will be demonstrated and mastered through a series of hands-on projects. There will be an emphasis on precision, the development of craft skills and the concept of physical as well as intellectual learning. This course provides the basic knowledge and experience necessary for intelligent use of the machine room facilities at SFCCA and is recommended for any students wishing to use this facility regularly. It is also a great chance to make real things out of real materials. Additional materials fee will be charged.
Introduction to the fundamentals of woodworking and its application to furniture. Topics covered in detail will include: the care and use of hand tools, hand power tools and larger woodworking machinery; fundamental techniques such as carving, shaping and finishing; joinery technology, construction processes and conventions; basic furniture design and wood technology. Processes will be demonstrated and mastered through a series of hands-on projects. There will be an emphasis on precision, the development of craft skills and the concept of physical as well as intellectual learning. This course provides the basic knowledge and experience necessary for intelligent use of the machine room facilities at SFCCA and is recommended for any students wishing to use this facility regularly. It is also a great chance to make real things out of real materials. Additional materials fee will be charged.
This class focuses on the dialogue between furniture and sculpture, exploring the borderline area between visual arts and design. Specifically examining the differing approaches to furniture demonstrated by visual artists and designers. Specific examples will be examined in class seminars and will include analysis of the works of Burton, Deacon, Puryear, Noguchi, Pesce, Salcedo, Kuromata, Loeser, and many others. The potential for functional objects to carry meaning beyond their tacit function will be explored through several practical projects.
The class will expand on the techniques learned in Introduction to Furniture, particularly in the tuning and use of hand tools, marking gauges and knives, chisels, hand-planes, handsaws. Techniques covered will include miters, dovetails, laying up veneers, the vacuum press, frame and panel construction, the torsion box and carcass construction using both solid wood and man-made boards. Students will be expected to acquire a range of hand-tools, will design and construct hand-tools as part of the course and will design and fabricate a cabinet piece. This class will help students develop strong woodworking techniques and a deeper understanding of the history and technology of woodworking. Cabinet will expand on the techniques learned in Introduction to Furniture. The class starts with an introduction, historical placement and discussion of the cabinet both as a furniture form and concept. Students will design and fabricate a cabinet with techniques that include miters, dovetails, laying up veneers, the use of the vacuum press, frame and panel construction, torsion box and carcass construction from both solid wood and man-made boards. There will be a strong emphasis on tuning, maintenance and use of a variety of hand tools such as chisels, knives, hand planes and saws. Each student will be expected to acquire a range of hand tools as well as the design and construction of a marking gauge that will join the furniture students growing tool collection. This class will help students develop strong woodworking techniques and a deeper understanding of the history and technology of woodworking.
A comprehensive introduction to metal fabrication techniques through the metal studio and welding facility on the San Francisco campus. Techniques covered will include cutting, stamping, milling, bending, cold fastening, welding and soldering sheet metal and extrusions. We will also investigate manufacturing processes readily available locally, such as casting, plasma cutting, CNC milling, spinning, plating and powder coating. Students will design, develop and fabricate lighting systems or lamps using a variety of these techniques. The class will also cover 12V and 110V systems and UL regulations. Additional materials fee will be charge.
This studio will entail a thorough exploration of the wide range of manufacturing processes available to studio-based production. It will include but not be limited to metal fabrication, metal casting, metal spinning, CNC milling, laser cutting, water-jet cutting, fiberglass, vacuum forming, plywood molding, powder-coating, enameling, concrete casting, and ceramic and glass production. Students will design and implement small-scale product runs of furniture or functional objects using a variety of these techniques. Sponsorship from local manufacturers will allow an in depth exploration of a particular material and its associated manufacturing processes for the final project. Sustainable practices and smart design will underpin all of the work completed in the studio. This studio will design and build sustainable, mobile and adaptable furniture for the current and future science curriculum at CCA. We are honored to have visiting professor Allan Wexler (www.allanwexlerstudio.com/) co-teach this endeavor. Mr. Wexler is a faculty member of Parsons the New School for Design and has taught art and architecture for more than 30 years. Over the course of his career his work has been featured in numerous national and international solo shows. He has lectured extensively and has been reviewed by most major art and architecture periodicals and newspapers. The course will include extensive field research at local science institutions including the California Academy of Sciences, The Exploratorium and the research labs of UCSF Mission Bay. This research will inform the students' designs and prototypes with the goal of inspiring and supporting scientific investigations for all CCA departments. Collaboration and sub-contracting will be a vital component of this complex project. The course will explore a range of manufacturing processes which may include: metal fabrication, cabinet making, metal casting, metal spinning, CNC milling, laser cutting, water-jet cutting, fiberglass molding, vacuum forming, plywood molding, powder coating, concrete casting, upholstery and other appropriate technologies. Support from local manufacturers will allow an in-depth exploration of each material and its associated manufacturing processes. For their projects, students will produce rendered sketches, sketch models, quick full-scale mock-ups, presentation models, measured plans, material lists, budgets, and production schedules. Students will be expected to compile complete bid packages from a number of outside vendors for their final presentations. The final critique will be a public presentation to an assembled panel from the college where each student team will pitch the objects they developed. Students will showcase their designs in a variety of media and provide budget estimates and build schedules. The panel will decide which projects are best suited to CCA and will contract to have them produced for use by Fall 2015.
We will study the origins of modern design and the major schools and philosophies of 20th Century furniture design. This will range from the 19th century roots of the Industrial Revolution, the Arts and Crafts movement, European design movements such as the Vienna Werkstatte and the Bauhaus, the development of the first international styles such as Art Nouveau, Art Deco and Modernism, through to contemporary studio art furniture, the use of furniture forms by contemporary visual artists and contemporary conceptual design. Throughout the seminar, the social, economic and cultural context of furniture will be emphasized and we will discuss the evolution of the domestic realm and the role of furniture within it. These topics will be presented in a series of lectures by the instructor together with focused readings and discussions. Students will complete a series of short writing exercises, develop a concept and catalog for an exhibition of furniture design and complete a written exam as part of their assessment.
This class must be taken in the semester immediately following Senior Studio 1. The work completed during Senior Studio 1 will be used as a foundation to create an exhibition body of work and written thesis around a particular theme of each student's choosing. The semester culminates with an off-campus Graduating Senior Exhibition